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Bernd Rohrauer

Bernd Rohrauer

Bernd Rohrauer has a background in fine arts, social design and social sciences. Originally based in the fields of painting and video arts, he started collaborating with artists and actors from different disciplines and crossed the bridge from canvas to social spaces. This is why he has professionally been working as a researcher and as social work scientist in the fields of community-work, urban social development and homeless assistance system in Austria. His professional as well as his art-based practice mainly deals with urban participation, appropriation practices and distributive justice. His art works have been exhibited and screened in galleries and international film festivals, as well as studio grants have brought him to Sardenia/Italy, Sheffield/UK, Ebensee/Austria and Salzburg/Austria. Since 2020 he has been working as an advisor to the management of an NGO in the field of homelessness and as a lecturer at the Department of Architecture at the Technical University in Vienna. He is also working on social design and art projects on participative video, walking and community mapping.
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pedestrian acts

By de Certeau: In “Walking in the City”, de Certeau conceives pedestrianism as a practice that is performed in the public space, whose architecture and behavioural habits substantially determine the way we walk. For de Certeau, the spatial order “organises an ensemble of possibilities (e.g. by a place in which one can move) and interdictions (e.g. by a wall that prevents one from going further)” and the walker “actualises some of these possibilities” by performing within its rules and limitations. “In that way,” says de Certeau, “he makes them exist as well as emerge.” Thus, pedestrians, as they walk conforming to the possibilities that are brought about by the spatial order of the city, constantly repeat and re-produce that spatial order, in a way ensuring its continuity. But, a pedestrian could also invent other possibilities. According to de Certeau, “the crossing, drifting away, or improvisation of walking privilege, transform or abandon spatial elements.” Hence, the pedestrians could, to a certain extent, elude the discipline of the spatial order of the city. Instead of repeating and re-producing the possibilities that are allowed, they can deviate, digress, drift away, depart, contravene, disrupt, subvert, or resist them. These acts, as he calls them, are pedestrian acts.

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