24 Jan 2020 | Reading and Walking

126. John Borrows, Canada’s Indigenous Constitution

A brief unscheduled pause: perhaps a respite, or an opportunity? The latter, I hope: I’m waiting for the questions I’m going to be asked on my comprehensive examinations to be formulated, and while I thought I was finished with my reading, I’ve decided to use this time to carry on, addressing one of the absences […]

03 Jan 2020 | Reading and Walking

125. Zoe Todd, “An Indigenous Feminist’s Take On The Ontological Turn: ‘Ontology’ Is Just Another Word For Colonialism”

I ran across a reference to Métis anthropologist Zoe Todd’s essay “An Indigenous Feminist’s Take On The Ontological Turn: ‘Ontology’ Is Just Another Word For Colonialism” in Stephanie Springgay’s and Sarah E. Truman’s Walking Methodologies in a More-than-Human World: Walking Lab. Their summary of her argument states that Todd, “like other Indigenous scholars, insist[s] that […]

31 Dec 2019 | Reading and Walking

New Year’s Eve Walk Around the Lake

I was mentally and physically incapable of reading anything this morning. Mentally, I was exhausted; physically, I was not up to the work of reading. As I’ve discovered, sitting still for hours, reading and taking notes, is physical labour. When I was younger, it was easier. Now it makes my knees ache: the same feeling […]

27 Dec 2019 | Reading and Walking

120. Rachel Adams, ed., Wanderlust: Actions, Traces, Journeys, 1967-2017

Wanderlust: Actions, Traces, Journeys, 1967-2017 is a big catalogue—no expense was spared in its publication, although it wasn’t copyedited very well—that documents a 50-year-survey exhibition on the theme of exploration “and how artists engage this theme in various ways including walking, performative actions, land use, endurance, and the consideration of public space” (4) that was […]

19 Dec 2019 | Reading and Walking

119. Ben Anderson, “Preemption, Precaution, Preparedness: Anticipatory Action and Future Geographies”

I wanted to read Ben Anderson’s “Preemption, Precaution, Preparedness: Anticipatory Action and Future Geographies” because I discovered that the definition of futurity that Eve Tuck and Rubén A. Gaztambide-Fernández take from Andrew Baldwin’s “Whiteness and Futurity: Towards a Research Agenda” is actually a quotation from Anderson’s essay. Baldwin’s essay is important, but if I’m going […]

06 Dec 2019 | Reading and Walking

115. Chris Mays, “‘You Can’t Make This Stuff Up’: Complexity, Facts, and Creative Nonfiction”

Tired of reading about methodologies in the social sciences, I retreated to more familiar ground: the humanities in general, and Chris Mays’s “‘You Can’t Make This Stuff Up’: Complexity, Facts, and Creative Nonfiction” in particular. Mays begins with a 30-year-old article on rhetoric by Jim W. Corder, in which Corder explains that “we all ‘creat[e] […]

05 Dec 2019 | Reading and Walking

114. Candace Jesse Stout, “Postrepresentational Qualitative Research Writing”

In my last post, I doubted the existence of something called “postrepresentational writing.” Foolish me! Here’s an editorial on just that topic. Apparently, that phrase means “writing about writing” (227)—at least in part. “[A]s postrepresentational qualitative researchers, we know the relationship between language and meaning to be fragile and thin,” Candace Stout writes (227). And […]

04 Dec 2019 | Reading and Walking

112e. Norman K. Denzin, Yvonna S. Lincoln, Linda Tuhiwai Smith, eds., Handbook of Critical and Indigenous Methodologies, concluded

Finally I arrived at the book’s final section (aside from its short epilogue): Part IV: “Power, Truth, Ethics, and Social Justice.” “Each chapter in this section connects indigenous theories, pedagogies, and modes of inquiry with emancipatory discourses,” the editors write. “Each works through and around, even if indirectly, critical theory and critical pedagogy. (The ghost […]

01 Dec 2019 | Reading and Walking

112d. Norman K. Denzin, Yvonna S. Lincoln, Linda Tuhiwai Smith, eds., Handbook of Critical and Indigenous Methodologies, continued

According to the editors, the chapters included in Part III, “Critical and Indigenous Methodologies,” “reflexively implement critical indigenous methodologies. . . . by transforming, rereading, and criticizing existing research practices, including life story, life history, ethnographic, autoethnographic, narrative, visual, and postcolonial methodologies” (323). They also elaborate on their earlier definition of indigenous methodology: “Critical indigenous […]