06 Dec 2019 | Reading and Walking

115. Chris Mays, “‘You Can’t Make This Stuff Up’: Complexity, Facts, and Creative Nonfiction”

Tired of reading about methodologies in the social sciences, I retreated to more familiar ground: the humanities in general, and Chris Mays’s “‘You Can’t Make This Stuff Up’: Complexity, Facts, and Creative Nonfiction” in particular. Mays begins with a 30-year-old article on rhetoric by Jim W. Corder, in which Corder explains that “we all ‘creat[e] […]

05 Dec 2019 | Reading and Walking

114. Candace Jesse Stout, “Postrepresentational Qualitative Research Writing”

In my last post, I doubted the existence of something called “postrepresentational writing.” Foolish me! Here’s an editorial on just that topic. Apparently, that phrase means “writing about writing” (227)—at least in part. “[A]s postrepresentational qualitative researchers, we know the relationship between language and meaning to be fragile and thin,” Candace Stout writes (227). And […]

04 Dec 2019 | Reading and Walking

112e. Norman K. Denzin, Yvonna S. Lincoln, Linda Tuhiwai Smith, eds., Handbook of Critical and Indigenous Methodologies, concluded

Finally I arrived at the book’s final section (aside from its short epilogue): Part IV: “Power, Truth, Ethics, and Social Justice.” “Each chapter in this section connects indigenous theories, pedagogies, and modes of inquiry with emancipatory discourses,” the editors write. “Each works through and around, even if indirectly, critical theory and critical pedagogy. (The ghost […]

01 Dec 2019 | Reading and Walking

112d. Norman K. Denzin, Yvonna S. Lincoln, Linda Tuhiwai Smith, eds., Handbook of Critical and Indigenous Methodologies, continued

According to the editors, the chapters included in Part III, “Critical and Indigenous Methodologies,” “reflexively implement critical indigenous methodologies. . . . by transforming, rereading, and criticizing existing research practices, including life story, life history, ethnographic, autoethnographic, narrative, visual, and postcolonial methodologies” (323). They also elaborate on their earlier definition of indigenous methodology: “Critical indigenous […]

01 Dec 2019 | Reading and Walking

112c. Norman K. Denzin, Yvonna S. Lincoln, Linda Tuhiwai Smith, eds., Handbook of Critical and Indigenous Methodologies, continued

The second part of the Handbook of Critical and Indigenous Methodologies focuses on critical and Indigenous pedagogies. Even though I’m not interested in pedagogy as part of this project, I persevered. “In the five chapters in Part II, indigenous scholars describe Hawaiian, Native American, Mestizaje, endarkened, and Islamic pedagogies,” which “exist in-between, border, marginal, and […]

01 Dec 2019 | Reading and Walking

112b. Norman K. Denzin, Yvonna S. Lincoln, Linda Tuhiwai Smith, Handbook of Critical and Indigenous Methodologies, continued

As I stated in the previous post, the Handbook of Critical and Indigenous Methodologies  is so long—some 600 pages—that I’ll be posting summaries of each of its sections, rather than trying to post one massive summary. Part 1 of the Handbook, the editors write, “begins with the suggested reform and decolonization of the academy through […]

01 Dec 2019 | Reading and Walking

112a. Norman K. Denzin, Yvonna S. Lincoln, Linda Tuhiwai Smith, eds., Handbook of Critical and Indigenous Methodologies

This book—it’s very long to be considered a mere “handbook,” but that’s how the editors and publisher describe it—is another of the texts my supervisor asked me to read for this project, and for that reason I needed to consider it carefully. It’s a long book—600 pages in all—and as a consequence, this summary is […]

15 Nov 2019 | Reading and Walking

111. Vanessa Watts, “Indigenous Place-Thought & Agency Amongst Humans and Non-Humans (First Woman and Sky Woman Go On a European World Tour!)”

I came across a reference to this article in Stephanie Springgay’s and Sarah E. Truman’s Walking Methodologies in a More-Than-Human World: WalkingLab, one of many texts they refer to that have resonance for my own work. Watts begins with two creation stories: the Haudenosaunee story of Sky Woman, and the Anishinaabe story about the Seven […]

14 Nov 2019 | Reading and Walking

110. Stuart Horodner, Walk Ways

Stuart Horodner, then at the Portland Institute of Contemporary Art in Oregon and now at the Singleton Center for the Arts in Lexington, Kentucky, curated a 2002 exhibition on walking art, Walk Ways, which travelled to, among other places, the Dalhousie Art Gallery in Halifax, Nova Scotia, and the Oakville Galleries, in Oakville. It’s possible […]

13 Nov 2019 | Reading and Walking

109. Stephanie Springgay and Sarah E. Truman, Walking Methodologies in a More-than-Human World: WalkingLab

Published as part of a series on research methods in the social sciences, Walking Methodologies in a More-than-Human World: WalkingLab still has something to offer for those of us who walk as an artistic practice. However, it’s not an easy read, particularly if, like me, you’ve never read A Thousand Plateaux, know little about assemblage […]

01 Nov 2019 | Reading and Walking

106. Albert Memmi, The Colonizer and the Colonized

Albert Memmi’s 1957 book Portrait du Colonisé précedé du Portrait du Colonisateur was first published in an English edition in 1965. Memmi was Tunisian, and since Tunisia was then a French colony, although one engaged in a struggle for liberation, he was one of the colonized. “I discovered that few aspects of my life and […]

31 Oct 2019 | Reading and Walking

Wandering Around Plymouth

I’m here for a walking conference, so what else was I going to do on my free day in Plymouth except go for a walk? I got a late start: I slept much longer than I’d expected. I must’ve been tired from the flight and the long bus ride here and the late arrival. I […]

19 Oct 2019 | Reading and Walking

105. Tacita Dean and Jeremy Millar, eds. Art Works: Place

Art Works: Place is part of a series of introductions published by Thames and Hudson; their book on performance is on my to-read list as well. It might seem too elementary, but since I’m interested in site-specific work—with “site” defined as a phenomenological response to a particular place, to borrow from Miwon Kwon—I thought it […]