Search
My feed

Workshop: how to design your own wayfinding system

you are here_Seite_3

Though there are exceptions, generally speaking, you don’t want those who, in one way or another, are under your care, to get lost. At the same time, if they are to explore an area that’s not overly well known to them, you also might want to evoke the sense of wonder that can come with exploration and discovery.

Martin Foessleitner is the founder and managing director of hi-pe.at, a Vienna-based applied information design agency. Since 1999, it has been developing universal design for municipalities, industrial enterprises, and non-profit organisations. Currently working on new information design for the Schönbrunn Palace, in Vienna.

Martin, together with Linda Rubene, during the mornings of Saturday 11 and 18, in this online course, will take you on a journey, where they will point the way to good design around the principles of navigation and orientation.

Through this workshop:

  • You will understand the relevance and principles of navigation and orientation.
  • You will learn how to design your own wayfinding system for your venue, garden, exhibition, collection.
  • You will have a first prototype of your own project, digital and analogue.

This workshop will be conducted online. Seats are limited.

This workshop will run during two mornings, on Saturday September 11, and Saturday September 18. On both days, the workshop will start at 8:30am and will run until noon. Times are CEST (Amsterdam, Berlin, Vienna).

Tickets are 25 euros, each. We are offering 5 early-bird tickets at 10 euros each.

Hosts

Martin Foessleitner

Martin Foessleitner

 
Linda Rubene

Linda Rubene

 

Supported by

hi-pe.at

Martin Foessleitner
This event has happened
Log in to book a ticket. Not registered yet? Register first.
Lost your password?

11 Sep, 2021
11 Sep, 2021

Online

One thought on “Workshop: how to design your own wayfinding system

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

desire path

A term mostly used by town planners or architects to describe the short-cut paths created by people. So a path around a square ‘green’ will often have a desire path cutting off the corners. Town planners recognise them as an admission that the initial path was put in the wrong place. Called ‘Elephant Paths’ in some countries.

Added by Alan Cleaver

Encountered a problem? Report it to let us know.

  • Include the page on which you encountered the problem.
  • Describe what happened.
  • Describe what you expected to happen.